Author Archives: Tobias Carroll

A Quick Technical Note for the Weekend

Posted by Tobias Carroll

Posting will be light this weekend, as we’re in the process of moving Vol.1 to a new host. The changes should be transparent, and there won’t be any need to update your bookmarks or feed reader settings. Indexing and Sunday Stories will return next weekend.

The only significant change is this: if you subscribe to our posts via email, you will need to resubscribe to our new mailing list next week.

Thanks for reading. See you on Monday.

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Afternoon Bites: Stephen Fry, Geoff Dyer on criticism, the Month of Letters challenge, and more

“It seems to me that now there could be a real incentive to write negatively. I would be wary if this were to serve as any sort of inducement to write witty and damning phrases. The key thing is the sensitivity of the response and the accuracy of the judgment.” At The Guardian, Geoff Dyer and Anna Baddely discuss criticism. (via MobyLives)

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The Week In Reviews: Jay-Z at Carnegie Hall, the journalism of Charles Dickens, Edward St Aubyn’s prose, and more

A weekly appreciation for the art of the review.

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Afternoon Bites: Hanksy Speaks! Chabon on comics! Straub on Walhberg! and more.

“…Feather and Conn are not Stan and Jack; their fates, their experiences, their biographies, and their personalities are quite different. Jack Kirby died in 1994, still idolized by fans, surrounded by his loving family, as far from the embittered loneliness of Mort Feather as you can be. And Stan Lee is still going strong, a potent creative force who seems to bear up under the tribulations and triumphs of a long and interesting life with the élan for which he has always been famous.” Michael Chabon is interviewed at The New Yorker‘s Book Bench.

  • Kate Zambreno’s Heroines has a cover.

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Coming Soon to a Lower East Side Near You*

Posted by Tobias Carroll

This post serves as your gentle reminder that on Thursday, we’ll be presenting our “Stories from the Lower East Side” reading at RAC at 9 Clinton Street.

The Lower East Side has been the source of some of our favorite art and music; the home to legendary music venues past and present; the site of social protests, economic upheaval, cheap pizza, and expensive cocktails. It is also the muse for Vol.1’s first event in Manhattan: a night of fiction and nonfiction inspired by this ever-shifting landscape. Four of our favorite writers — including two alumni of our Sunday Story Series — will read work informed by the Lower East Side. Join us on February 9th at RAC, (9 Clinton Street), beginning at 7 PM. Bios follow; Facebook RSVP here. Continue reading

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Afternoon Bites: Chris Andrews on translation, Hot Lit Mags, James Sturm on Jack Kirby, and more

Tom Roberge looks at 13 different ways of interacting with Anne Carson’s Nox.

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Notes on Quentin Rowan, Yeti, and Bits of Spy Novels

Posted by Tobias Carroll

Yeti editor Mike McGonigal recently set up a blog, including a page with some information on upcoming Yeti books. One of them? Quentin Rowan’s Never Say Goodbye.

Right about now would probably be a good time to link to Edward Champion’s coverage of the plagiarism in Rowan’s spy novel Assassin of Secrets (written under the name QR Markham); there’s also a piece on Rowan in this week’s New Yorker.

On his site, McGonigal has this to say about the upcoming book: “I decided to publish it because I think it’s a really good book, and that it turns out Mr. Rowan really is a strong writer. Too bad it took all this craziness for him to finally write.” The reception for this book should be an interesting one…

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