Category Archives: Lit.

The Week In Reviews: Jay-Z at Carnegie Hall, the journalism of Charles Dickens, Edward St Aubyn’s prose, and more

A weekly appreciation for the art of the review.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Lit., reviews

There Will Be Adam Wilson

Posted by Jason Diamond

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Lit.

Greatest Books I’ve Never Read #1: “On The Road”

Posted by Nick Curley

In each volume of his bound-to-be-award-winning series “The Greatest Books I’ve Never Read”, avid procrastinator and V1 editor Nick Curley profiles a renowned tome of fiction that, for a variety of reasons, he has not gotten around to completing during his tenure on this earth.  In other words: an almost entirely uninformed book review.  This series aims to be confessional, cathartic, and as embarrassing as possible. It is an inquiry into non-reading where reading should have been: a descent into the illiterate soul. Join him in our shared, faux-bookish plight: we are in this together, and he is dying for your sins.

THIS WEEK’S ADVENTURE: On the Road by Jack Kerouac (Viking, 1957)

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Lit.

Literary Ephemera: Modernist lit. journals from the early 20th Century

Posted by Jason Diamond

Today we learned (via The Morning News) that Brown University and The University of Tulsa have teamed up to digitize a bunch of early 20th Century literary magazines, and believe it’s safe to say that The Modernist Journals Project is possibly the best thing we’ve seen all week.  We look forward to reading “The Freewoman,” then following it up with “The New Freewoman.”

Follow Vol. 1 Brooklyn on TwitterFacebookGoogle + and our Tumblr.

2 Comments

Filed under Lit.

Coming Soon to a Lower East Side Near You*

Posted by Tobias Carroll

This post serves as your gentle reminder that on Thursday, we’ll be presenting our “Stories from the Lower East Side” reading at RAC at 9 Clinton Street.

The Lower East Side has been the source of some of our favorite art and music; the home to legendary music venues past and present; the site of social protests, economic upheaval, cheap pizza, and expensive cocktails. It is also the muse for Vol.1’s first event in Manhattan: a night of fiction and nonfiction inspired by this ever-shifting landscape. Four of our favorite writers — including two alumni of our Sunday Story Series — will read work informed by the Lower East Side. Join us on February 9th at RAC, (9 Clinton Street), beginning at 7 PM. Bios follow; Facebook RSVP here. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Events, Lit.

Notes on Quentin Rowan, Yeti, and Bits of Spy Novels

Posted by Tobias Carroll

Yeti editor Mike McGonigal recently set up a blog, including a page with some information on upcoming Yeti books. One of them? Quentin Rowan’s Never Say Goodbye.

Right about now would probably be a good time to link to Edward Champion’s coverage of the plagiarism in Rowan’s spy novel Assassin of Secrets (written under the name QR Markham); there’s also a piece on Rowan in this week’s New Yorker.

On his site, McGonigal has this to say about the upcoming book: “I decided to publish it because I think it’s a really good book, and that it turns out Mr. Rowan really is a strong writer. Too bad it took all this craziness for him to finally write.” The reception for this book should be an interesting one…

Leave a comment

Filed under Lit.

Reviewed: “Sister Stop Breathing” by Chiara Barzini

Review by Tobias Carroll

Sister Stop Breathing
by Chiara Barzini
Calimari Press; 92 p.

Chiara Barzini’s collection Sister Stop Breathing isn’t a lengthy collection, but its range of emotions and tones can be exhausting. Though these stories are, for the most part, brief, the shifts from realism to surrealism, from the American Southwest to urban Italy, can be dizzying. Like the collages that complement some of the stories, the full scope of the organization here can seem dense at first. What emerges is primarily rewarding, transporting the reader to a strange space between known qualities.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Lit., reviews